Today's Letters: Violence in Lowertown is everyone's problem

Today's Letters: Violence in Lowertown is everyone's problem

Tuesday, June 11: This Ottawa neighborhood was supposed to support a vibrant residential and business community, says a reader. You can also write to us at cards@Ottawacitizen.com

Published June 11, 2024Last update 2 hours ago2 minute reading

Ottawa Police Car at ByWard Market
Ottawa police investigate overnight shooting at ByWard Market in 2022. Photo by Ashley Fraser /POSTMEDIA

Lowertown is everyone’s problem

Re: Lowertown’s violence crisis is a citywide problemJune 4.

Thanks for Bruce Deachman’s article on Lowertown’s problems. The violence and decay there are a problem for all of Ottawa.

Lowertown/Byward has the potential to be a social and economic driver for Ottawa. Instead, 20 years of neglect have turned it into an expensive eyesore that is dragging down the entire city. Crime has become Lowertown’s signature reputation, and the knee-jerk reaction of increasing police presence will not solve the problem. As Deachman points out, we need a citywide commitment to change and that change has to address the underlying factors that produce crime.

Ottawa Citizen

THIS CONTENT IS RESERVED ONLY FOR SUBSCRIBERS

Subscribe now to read the latest news in your city and across Canada.

  • Exclusive articles by Elizabeth Payne, David Pugliese, Andrew Duffy, Bruce Deachman and others. Plus, food reviews and event listings in the weekly Ottawa newsletter, Out of Office.
  • Unlimited online access to Ottawa Citizen and 15 news sites with a single account.
  • Ottawa Citizen ePaper, an electronic replica of the print edition to view on any device, share and comment.
  • Daily puzzles, including the New York Times crossword.
  • Support local journalism.

SUBSCRIBE TO UNLOCK MORE ITEMS

Subscribe now to read the latest news in your city and across Canada.

  • Exclusive articles by Elizabeth Payne, David Pugliese, Andrew Duffy, Bruce Deachman and others. Plus, food reviews and event listings in the weekly Ottawa newsletter, Out of Office.
  • Unlimited online access to Ottawa Citizen and 15 news sites with a single account.
  • Ottawa Citizen ePaper, an electronic replica of the print edition to view on any device, share and comment.
  • Daily puzzles, including the New York Times crossword.
  • Support local journalism.

REGISTER/LOG IN TO UNLOCK MORE ITEMS

Create an account or log in to continue your reading experience.

  • Access articles from all over Canada with a single account.
  • Share your thoughts and join the conversation in the comments.
  • Enjoy additional items per month.
  • Receive email updates from your favorite authors.

Login or create an account

either

Article content

I have lived most of my life in Ottawa, the last 17 in Lowertown. When I moved to Lowertown, the city’s vision for this neighborhood was to support a vibrant residential and business community. The ByWard Market was the center of this vision: a thriving daytime farmers’ market, a lively bar and restaurant, and a significant population of permanent residents. Architectural heritage would be respected and new small-scale development encouraged. The truck route through the center of the community would be managed by distributing traffic on new and existing connections between Ontario and Quebec. Finally, the problems of homelessness, drug abuse, and crime would be managed through new housing programs, community policing, and a move away from large homeless shelters.

Instead, none of the elements of this vision have been implemented. More services for the homeless have been added, increasing the concentration of people in difficulty. The number of bars skyrocketed, drawing people from the suburbs to places where drugs were easy to get. The farmers market was allowed to die. The city tacitly accepted the half-hearted idea of ​​an “entertainment district.”

Article content

Trucks continue to circulate through the community. Residential development in high-rise condominiums, primarily for students or short-term residents, has scarred the urban landscape and has done little to create a strong community.

Today, the city should commit to a formal visioning and planning process for the revitalization of Lowertown based on the concept of the 15-minute neighborhood it once was. The primary stakeholders in this process should be residents, landowners, business leaders, and institutions that have a direct interest in ByWard/Lowertown.

Norman Moyer, former president of the Lowertown Citizens Association

Poisoning rats will not eliminate them

Re: City of Ottawa presents new strategy in war against ratsJune 7th.

The use of poisonous rodenticides does not solve the causes of rodent infestations, but it causes the inhumane death of a multitude of wildlife species, as well as companion animals.

Human behavior affects rodent behavior. We’ve been poisoning rodents for decades and it’s obviously not working. Studies on the consequences of baiting in sewers clearly demonstrate that highly toxic rodenticides end up in wastewater, rivers and are found in the liver of freshwater fish. Since rodenticides have a long half-life, secondary poisoning of predators is a constant risk with any use of these products. There are many cost-effective, long-term alternatives to the reckless use of poison. Even New York politicians say “we can’t poison our way out of this.”

Janice Freund, Pickering

Recommended by Editorial

  1. The statue of Louis Riel in front of the Golden Boy at the Manitoba Legislature.  Opinions on Riel have changed considerably over time.

    Today’s letters: Be careful with the deputies you call “traitors”

  2. Rob Delatolla is the engineering professor who led wastewater surveillance in Ottawa, which was key to tracking COVID in the region's early stages.

    Today’s Letters: Don’t Kill Ontario’s Wastewater Testing Plan

Article content

Read more

India24Live Favicon

Oh hi there 👋
It’s nice to meet you.

Sign up to receive awesome content in your inbox, every day.

We don’t spam! Read our [link]privacy policy[/link] for more info.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *